Publications

I have written, read and shared many words about ‘being inspiring’  through my lifetime. I am gradually drawing these contributions – my electronic footprint, as it were – together on this site and will increase the list in the coming months. I hope you find some of them a source of inspiration in your own lives.

Books

Street Smarts For Challenging Times

StreetSmarts2Dr. Paul W. Blythe Ph.D, Balboa Press (August 18, 2011)

People who need more inspiring ideas about how they can feel fulfillment facing challenges will appreciate STREET SMARTS For Challenging Times. People who want to make a difference in their personal life and want to inspire their friends and family will love STREET SMARTS.

STREET SMARTS For Challenging Times promises that a fulfilling life is possible, if we decide to make it happen. It lets us see beyond “normal” communication styles to  how we can make a difference. STREET SMARTS helps us use our inner potentials and overcome discouraging criticism. Its wealth of ideas offers us a sense that we can find fulfillment at work, at home and socially.

Purchase options:

 

Street Smarts for a Troubled World

StreetSmarts1Dr. Paul W. Blythe Ph.D, Universal Publishers (March 15, 2003)

People who need more concrete ideas of invisible forces at work in us, without “airy-fairy” explanations to be taken on faith will appreciate STREET SMARTS. People who want to make a difference in their personal life and want to create a better world for our children will love STREET SMARTS.

STREET SMARTS promises a fulfilling life is possible, if we decide to make it happen. It lets us see beyond our cultural blind spots and see how our input can make a difference. STREET SMARTS helps us use our inner potentials and overcome discouraging criticism from others. A wealth of ideas gives us a sense of direction to find fulfillment at work, at home and socially.

Papers

Beyond Survival in the Information Age (Logotherapy and Resourcefulness: Preventative Stress Management)

Drs. Paul W. Blythe and Hiroshi Takashima, Japan Society of Logotherapy and Humanistic Anthropology (Vol 2, No 2, 1989)

As an educator in Adelaide for ten years, I had exercised myself with the problem of educating for the future and I have come to have one personal education objective. One word, “resourcefulness,” relies most heavily on knowledge management rather than knowledge accumulation along with a sense that we live in a predictable universe and that things will turn out as best as can be expected.

Read the full article: BeyondSurvival  (by two good news men!)

Silence Is Golden

Paul W. Blythe, Canadian Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy (Vol 9, No 1, 1975)

Many of us find ourselves in a leadership role with discussion groups and other loosely defined teaching functions. We have all, at one time or another, experienced “that uncomfortable silence,” and it always seems to be the responsibility of the leader to “jump in” and get the thing going again. A leader who fails to come to the aid of a faltering group in this instance can engender a good deal of ire, indignation, and disappointment on the part of the group members. Yet, an interjection by a leader at this point is usually unsatisfying to the leader as it is tantamount to a summation of the proceedings in a closing action on the issues at hand. Groups tend not to start up easily after this point and leaders have to spend considerable time and effort to regenerate a productive level of discussion. There is a third approach to the dilemma which I have tried, namely the legitimization of silence.

Read the full article: SilenceIsGolden-PB

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3 thoughts on “Publications”

  1. I loved your Silence is Golden article! It still rings true even today. I have been in many situations where you could cut the silence with a knife. I recall watching new psychiatrists trying to lead a therapy group, only to see them start to fidget and become uncomfortable in their seats when none of the patients spoke. A metaphor I use for that feeling of discomfort is my own condition of restless leg syndrome. I imagine that is how the person must feel trying to resist the urge to break the silence, which has become unbearable, much as my leg cramps. Silence is often associated with scheming, mistrust, and just plain dislike. No one wants to be disliked. I remember a saying I heard from a friend who has children: “When they are noisy, you know everything is ok. It’s the quiet that is worrisome”. I had to lead a group once where this silence took hold. I tried very hard to maintain that silence, and we literally all sat there and stared at each other until one of the patients could no longer take it and burst into speech, which then was the catalyst for quite a lively discussion on…what else??….Silence! Thanks for a great article.

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