Kangaroo Island (South Australia) is Inspiring!

Two weeks ago, I was invited to move to Kangaroo Island by my Daughter and Son-in-law. This was attracted, as I would be more “with family” and so it has been.  However, one can’t go more than a day or two without meeting with new friends.  I am not sure but is seems they all know each other, over many kilometers. People here say G’d (In the words of Crocodile Dundee, now famous because of his movie and other appearances on TV. Although my memory can’t hold the names of many, I have become known to more than a couple dozen and there is a code of practice here to invite visitors to have a cup of tea or coffee and cookies.

Almost everyone belongs to a group where some activity is the focus of camaraderie, such as scrabble or other games like Bowls on bowling greens, or just meeting acquaintances for coffee. Having worked as a psychologist at the Hospital, I have been invited to meet for coffee at the local cafe’s.  One coffee example is a Journalist whom I met because of her work on Vietnam and with the resent attention focused on Australian former military people who served there in the past.  I was curious if she was still a journalist, covering the current activities.

Working in the past on the mainland, with people who were isolated by family differences of opinion, I was aware that isolated people might face health risks. However, here the “Islanders” would not let that happen because it seems to be a duty to visit with new comers.  It is now my understanding that most people would greet others with a wave or a G’day and shopkeepers go beyond “thanks,” to say “have a good day.”

Moreover, I notice that news of families going on holidays elsewhere is announced, with a sort of apology for being away.

I am aware that elsewhere in rural areas, this practice of caring for others exists, yet this caring about others seems strong as what would be in a large country town. Moreover, this caring expression applies to others who are in other country towns etc.

Another facet of this above style is that a new friend could suggest contact with two or three others. If we fail to follow through, the failure is registered as a disappointment

Forgiving Can Be Very Inspiring

I think we all have “stepped on someone’s toes” and said: “sorry.”   This may be the receiving of that person’s forgiveness and is usually taken on board with a sense of relief. That relief gives us a sense the we have “evened the score.”

In a Readers Digest article by Lia Granger, she starts her article entitled “HEALING THROUGH FORGIVING,” with the following remarks:”For weeks, Karsten Mathiasen had been consumed by rage. Several months earlier, the Danish circus director’s wife had left him to live with another man. Overwhelmed with hatred for his wife’s new lover, the 40 year old lay awake at night, a knot of pain growing in his stomach and angry thoughts swirling. He began drinking in the evenings to get to sleep. 

Eventually, it was the concern if his two young children that persuaded Karsten that he should meet the man at a Copenhagen coffee shop. Karsten knew he would be meeting his wife’s new partner. Instead of one coffee, the two men had many, talking for hours. 

As Karsten headed home, he was amazed to discover than his anger and sadness were gone. But more than that, he felt physically good – for the first time in months. He slept like a baby that night and awoke with a clear mind and a relaxed body.” 

Here’s another example: “Rosalyn Boyce’s life unravelled in 1999 after a man came into her London home and raped her as her two-year-old daughter slept in the next room. The perpetrator, a serial rapist, was captured three weeks later and given three life sentences. 

But for Rosalyn the nightmare was far from over. The memory of the attack filled her mind constantly, and she was forced to move out of her family house to escape. Doctors diagnosed her with post-traumatic stress disorder and reactive depression and prescribed Prozac and tranquillisers. She began drinking a bottle of wine every night to block things out. 

As her mental and physical health deteriorated, Rosalyn realised she would have to heal herself through therapy and she discovered that the only way was to forgive her attacker. “To me, forgiveness meant that I no longer had to feel any attachment to my rapist and I could free myself from the crime. Also, forgiveness is not about condoning, she writes: “In 2014, Rosalyn was able to meet and forgive him, through a restorative justice programme. She says of that meeting: “I don’t think about the rape anymore. It disappeared in a puff of smoke!”

The dog eat dog Western Society in replete with perpetrators.   I, Paul, who has posted this topic, believe I will be meditating about incidences in my life, as I don’t think forgiveness needs a personal contact with a couple abusers in my past! Yet, it seems a proven routine for personal health for me. How about you?

 

Innate Intelligence is Inspiring

Innate Intelligence is a special idea used in the Palmer School of Chiropractic in USA and other parts of the world. I was introduced to it many years ago when I lived in Canada.

I had suffered a cross-country skying fall and my knee was swollen.  Some time before this, I had met Dr. Joseph Houlton, a neighbour and a Chiropractor. He used to say: “The Chiropractor does the adjustment but Innate Intelligence does the healing.” He also gave me a paper called “The Story of “That Something” by B J Palmer, the founder of the first Palmer School of Chiropractic in USA. The paper called: The Story of “That Something.

The story begins like this: “Then Randolph turned to me: ‘Man, write that story you’ve told us. Write is so that every man may read….” The story goes on as another man continues to talk of his search for “That Something.” However, eventually, it mentions many instances where living a life of service, at times even without pay.

Personally, as I have been living many years in a life of purpose. Thus, I have learned if and when I am On Purpose. Yet, perhaps it is by the help of Innate Intelligence. Approaching the age of 80, I look back at all the great things that have happened to me. Yet, how does “being on purpose” relate to Innate Intelligence?

Some years back, I became interested in caring for honey bees. At the time I was studying at university toward three degrees in Psychology. I have come to see that Innate Intelligence is expressed in the bee hive by the way scouts enter the hive and express this by regurgitating pollen and nectar, then by dancing a triangular dance which tells carriers the direction and distance of the source. Also, the hive is self regulating according to the momentary needs for food needed by the brood and choosing “royal jelly” for the larvae of new “queens” and yet an another food for eventually creating “drones” which will fly and mate with a new queen so she can take over the duty of birthing scores brood which become future workers, drones and potential queen’s.

Also, before a day that is going to be a hot day, scouts and carriers with cease their yesterday work so scouts and carriers will switch to carrying water, and many in the hive begin fanning their wings to have necessary water cooling so that the hive doesn’t melt in the heat. Actually, I have commented on this whole process as evidence of the spiritual presence of “a higher power,” thus attending to the need for the continuing existence of bees on our planet.

If people are sceptical of the Chiropractic idea of Innate Intelligence doing the healing as the practitioner does the adjustment, we have to take account of the bees and many other wonders such as photosynthesis of leaves turning toward the sun and the homing “instinct” of birds other creatures.

To conclude this consideration of Innate Intelligence, I would add that, in my counselling work, I have accommodated to the idea of transpersonal communication. I sense that this is also evidence of Innate Intelligence, although some might be sceptical. My evidence of this is a common experience. Many have the experience when they phone a person and hear them say: “I was thinking of you just before you phoned me!”

Discovering Natural Harmony is Inspiring

Readers Digest Author, Lisa Fields has written about her discovery of a sense of rhythm.  She states: “After decades of self-consciousness, I yearned to let loose on the dance floor.”  She was asked if she would like to dance, by a recent boyfriend.  She hesitated but he encouraged her to try it, saying: “You’ll enjoy it!”

She writes: “Deep down, I’ve always loved how free I felt on the few occasions when I allowed myself to move with complete abandon at a packed nightclub… Most other times that I felt compelled to dance, I was tense and awkward, worried that everyone was watching and would see that I was doing it ‘wrong.’ “As a teen, I waited endlessly for me dad  to provide my Brady-style lessons,but he never offered and I never asked.  At school dances, I’d sway to power ballads with boys at arm’s length but, whenever a fast song began, I’d dash for the closest chair.  I was shy and self-conscious and didn’t want to look foolish around my peers.”

In high school, when they taught YMCA dance moves, the teen teaching us rebuked me in front of everyone.” (She goes on in the article with similar examples but ends with a victory! However, she remembers a boyfriend who was even shyer than she was. Also, she saw the solution to the shyness. She began to see that life, in the world we live in, is full of critical attitudes and that the notion of fixing things is to be critical.) 

At this point, must reflect of my own 44 year marriage.  In spite of an educational system, which buys into that ancient Greek school which teaches the need to think critically,  my late wife and I never fought!  I know this seems impossible to most people in today’s world, but our daughter has a different experience.  One day when, I was showing a new volunteer, called Lan, around the my daughter’s conservation facility in Port Adelaide, Australia. When I mentioned that my daughter was my CEO. This new person was surprised and asked: “Don’t you fight?” I said “No” at that moment. However, later over coffee, I mentioned to my Lan’s surprise that we don’t fight. My daughter’s reply was “We never learned!” I imagine that she doesn’t fight with anyone nor believe that criticism is effective in her work and marriage. I think she seeks to find the motivations of others’ apparent mistakes and perhaps conveys alternatives without criticism.

Discovering Natural Harmony is Inspiring

Readers Digest Author, Lisa Fields has written about her discovery of a sense of rhythm. She states: “After decades of self-consciousness, I yearned to let loose on the dance floor.” She was asked if she would like to dance, by a recent boyfriend. She hesitated but he encouraged her to try it, saying: “You’ll enjoy it!”

She writes: “Deep down, I’ve always loved how free I felt on the few occasions when I allowed myself to move with complete abandon at a packed nightclub… Most other times that I felt compelled to dance, I was tense and awkward, worried that everyone was watching and would see that I was doing it ‘wrong.’ ”

“As a teen, I waited endlessly for me dad to provide my Brady-style lessons,but he never offered and I never asked. At school dances, I’d sway to power ballads with boys at arm’s length but, whenever a fast song began, I’d dash for the closest chair. I was shy and self-conscious and didn’t want to look foolish around my peers.”

In high school, when they taught YMCA dance moves, the teen teaching us rebuked me in front of everyone.” (She goes on in the article with similar examples but ends with a victory! However, she remembers a boyfriend who was even shyer than she was. Also, she saw the solution to the shyness. She began to see that life, in the world we live in, is full of critical attitudes and that the notion of fixing things is to be critical.)

At this point, must reflect of my own 44 year marriage. In spite of an educational system, which buys into that ancient Greek school which teaches the need to think critically, my late wife and I never fought! I know this seems impossible to most people in today’s world, but our daughter has a different experience. One day when

I was showing a new volunteer, called Lan, around the my daughter’s conservation facility in Port Adelaide, Australia. When I mentioned that my daughter was my CEO. This new person was surprised and asked: “Don’t you fight?” I said “No” at that moment. However, later over coffee, I mentioned to my Lan’s surprise that we don’t fight.   My daughter’s reply was “We never learned!” I imagine that she doesn’t fight with anyone nor believe that criticism is effective in her work and marriage. I think she seeks to find the motivations of others’ apparent mistakes and perhaps conveys alternatives without criticism.